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Monday, October 19, 2020 | History

4 edition of Volume equations for second-growth Douglas-fir. found in the catalog.

Volume equations for second-growth Douglas-fir.

David Bruce

Volume equations for second-growth Douglas-fir.

by David Bruce

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  • 37 Currently reading

Published in Portland, Or .
Written in English


Edition Notes

SeriesResearch note PNW -- 239.
The Physical Object
Pagination5 p.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17618319M
OCLC/WorldCa1213714

Six candidate height-diameter models were used to analyze the height-diameter relationships. The common methods for estimating the height-diameter models have taken the classical (frequentist) approach based on the frequency interpretation of probability, for example, the nonlinear least squares method (NLS) and the maximum likelihood method (ML). predict bole volume for five mixed conifer species in California. Forest Science. 30(1): Behre, C. Edward. Form class taper tables and volume tables and their application. Journal of Agriculture Research Biging, Greg S. Taper equations for second-growth mixed conifers of northern California. Forest Science. 30(4.

  The sample was selected within archives of volume measurements taken in growth and yield permanent plots between and It is made up of trees belonging to seven important species: Sessile Oak, Common Beech, Douglas Fir, Norway Spruce, Scots Pine, Maritime Pine and Silver Fir.   Graphs of Douglas-fir (a) and western hemlock (b) fertilisation response. Percent change in volume growth is shown for an application of kg/ha of urea fertiliser at age 50 for low (site index = 21 for Douglas-fir, site index = 25 for western hemlock), medium (site index = 29 for both species), and high (site index = 37 for Douglas-fir, site index = 33 for western hemlock) sites.

Literature Cited Bruce, David; Derlars, Donald J. Volume equations for second- growth Douglas-fir. Res. Note PNW Portland, OR: U.S. - Department of Agricul ture. considers the ability of three Douglas-fir cubic-foot volume equations, an important step in finding tarif numbers, to predict volume in an indepen-dent data set from western Oregon. Secondly, this report discusses the accuracy of field measurements. The Tarif System "Tarif" volume tables were derived in Britain by Dr. F. C. Humel in


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Volume equations for second-growth Douglas-fir by David Bruce Download PDF EPUB FB2

Equations are given for estimating merchantable volumes of second-growth Douglas-fir stands to specified breast high and top diameter limits, in cubic feet or board feet, from total volume in cubic feet and certain associated stand characteristics. KEYWORDS: Volume (merchantable), second-growth.

Get this from a library. Volume equations for second-growth Douglas-fir. [David Bruce; Donald J DeMars; Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.)].

DOUGLAS-FIR STANDS FROM TOTAL CUBIC VOLUME AND ASSOCIATED STAND CHARACTERISTICS by Richard L. Williamson, Silviculturist and Robert 0. Curtis, Principal Mensurationist ABSTRACT Equations are given for estimating merchantable volumes of second-growth Douglas-fir stands to specified breast high and topAuthor: Richard L.

Williamson, Robert O. Curtis. Bruce, D. and D.J. DeMars. Volume Equations for Second-Growth Douglas-Fir. US Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Research Note PNW, 5 pages. Rennie, J.C. and Boehmer, W. A comparison of tree volume estimation methods for West Tennessee hardwoods.

Tennessee Farm and Home Science. Volume no Caption title "May " Gives equations for estimating diameters at breast height of second-growth Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) from measured stump diameters over bark and stump heights, based on measurements Pages: Volume Equations for Second-Growth Douglas-Fir.

US Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Research Note PNW, 5 pages. Clark III, A. Sawmill Residue Yields from Yellow-Poplar Saw Logs. Forest Products Journal 26(1) Farr, W.A. and V.J. LaBau.

Cubic-Foot Volume Tables and. The impact of different sample designs and sizes on the fitting of height-diameter equations and subsequent prediction of volume is explored in this thesis. Several different height-diameter equation forms were compared for estimating height in second growth Douglas-fir.

1 in scaling second growth Douglas-fir logs. The data used in comparing the various rules were obtained from actual log measurements of 23 second growth Douglas-fir trees in the McDonald Forest. A log of 32 feet vs used as a standard for the conutations. Measurements of the diameter inside bark were taken every 16 feet of length to a top of approximately 6 inches.

Canary JW, Harrison RB, Compton JE, Chappell HN. Additional carbon sequestration following repeated urea fertilization of second-growth Douglas-fir stands in western Washington. For. Ecol. Manage. Crossref, ISI, Google by: 6. use by the State of Washington. The tarif system shows the gross volume of trees based on species, tree diameter, and total height.

It’s one of several types of tree-volume tables. The tree-volume tables supported by this publication are for Douglas-fir, grand fir, western hemlock, ponderosa pine, western redcedar, and red alder. Two equation forms were compared and evaluated. Forest inventory data from Jackson Demonstration State Forest were used to fit the equations.

These height-diameter equations will be useful in explaining height-diameter relationships in largely uneven-aged coastal redwood/Douglas-fir stands, and for predicting missing heights in forest inventories.

Volume equations are used to predict the content of stems of standing trees as a function of easily measured tree attributes such as diameter at breast height and tree height. Various functions have been proposed for predicting volume of a specified portion of the bole from stump height to a fixed top limit.

A simple measure of stem form derived from geometric principles provides a basis for compatible volume and stem profile equations. Height ratios corresponding to three diameter ratios provide this measure and are compared in simple linear regression equations that predict a cylindrical form factor using data from a Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugamenziesii (Mirb.).

Volume equations for second-growth Douglas-fir. USDA For. Serv. Res. Note PNW, 5 pp. Burkhart, H. and Walton, S., Incorporating crown ratio into taper equations. To find the tarif number, total stem cubic-foot volume and the diameter at breast height are needed for each sample tree.

In this report, three volume equations that could be used to calculate tarif tested on an independent data set of sectioned young growth Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (mirb.).

Effects of density control and fertilization on growth and yield of young Douglas-fir plantations in the Pacific Northwest Yuzhen Li, a Eric C. Turnblom, a David G.

Briggs a a Bloedel HallCollege of Forest Resources, P.O. BoxUniversity of Washington, Seattle, WAUSA. A number of height-diameter and height-diameter-age equations were compared for second-growth Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco).

Most gave similar results within the range of the. to a high degree of Douglas fir, most stands being over 80 per cent, and 'many per cent, of this species. This is due to the abilitv of Douglas fir to establish itself by natural means more successfully than any of its associates in open areas following fire or logging.

(PI. 2.) These young forests as a rule are even aged, the larger. Each installation covered hectare and contained 24–48 plot-tree Douglas-fir on a m grid (Littke et al., c).Plot-trees were individual dominant or co-dominant Douglas-fir surrounded by a 5-m radius treatment area (81 m 2).Plot centers were skipped if the understory changed species changed, if the overstory was dominated by species other than Douglas-fir, or if the slope or aspect.

Crown ratio was incorporated into four Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugamenziesii (Mirb.)Franco) total-stem cubic volume equations as a nonlinear multiplier.

Two of the equations are traditional linear equations, one is nonlinear, and one is a new component approach that divides stem volume into that above and that below breast height. Calibration of volume and component biomass equations for Douglas-fir and lodgepole pine in Western Oregon forests by Krishna P.

Poudel1 and Temesgen Hailemariam 1* ABSTRACT Using data from destructively sampled Douglas-fir and lodgepole pine trees, we evaluated the performance of .scope of this book.

This chapter focuses on biomass of trees. Tree biomass may be that of a single Table presents equations for Figure shows an example of biomass dis-tribution of a 16 inch ( cm) dbh Douglas-fir tree as calculated from the equations in Table About 83% of the biomass of this tree is above.Estimating merchantable volumes of second growth Douglas-fir stands from total cubic volume and associated stand characteristics.

Portland, Or.: Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, [] (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication.